So does life imitate art, or is it vice-versa?

A few weeks ago, I guess at the beginning of March, CBS debuted its much-hyped fourth venture into the Crime Scene Investigator world – CSI Cyber.  It didn’t hurt that the lead FBI agent, Patricia Arquette, had just won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, a point not lost on CBS, who made no bones about that in their advertisements of the show once she had won it.  Considering that I enjoyed her performance in NBC’s Medium, and that I teach Cyber Security, I figured I’d give it a try.

Now I’m no media critic, but to me, the characters were not only stock characters from central casting, they just didn’t ring true.  The technical constructs also did not ring true – I don’t know of any code editor that will display malicious code in red.  But the one thing that seemed incomprehensible, even in this day of the Internet of Things (IoT), was that the central premise of the premiere episode was that someone was hacking into bedroom baby-cams in order to use them to kidnap babies.  The “unsubs” as they are known, were hacking in, making it seem like the children were still in their cribs, breaking into homes, and taking the children.  The whole thing sounded preposterous, until . . . wireless baby cam hacked – from Computerworld

It didn’t happen just once an unnamed mom told KTTC. “We were sleeping in bed, and basically heard some music coming from the nursery, but then when we went into the room the music turned off.” At one point, the family faced the camera “toward the wall, and then a few hours later we accessed the Foscam, and it wasn’t facing the wall it was facing the closet.”

“We were able to track down the IP address through the log files within the Foscam software and found out that it was coming from Amsterdam,” the mom said. “That IP address had a web link attached to it.” After following the link, she found, “at least fifteen different countries listed and it’s not just nurseries — it’s people’s living rooms, their bedrooms, their kitchens. Every place that people think is sacred and private in their home is being accessed.”

After searching through “thousands and thousands” of pictures coming from IP cameras, the family saw their nursery. “You can literally just sort by whatever country suits your fancy, and whatever room suits your fancy,” the mom said. “It’s pretty sick.”

So now we have to worry about baby-cams REALLY being taken control of by wireless intruders.  What’s the recommendation to mitigate this bizarre threat?  Like any other device, it has firmware.  And that firmware needs to be updated, because just like any other firmware, security patches are included in it.  So if you have a Foscam baby-cam, you need to make sure that its firmware is current.

But that’s not all. Even if your WiFi router/access point is password-protected (and hopefully, with something more secure than the default password or just “password” or “123456”), the Foscam baby-cam can be password-protected, too.  And it needs to be.  And it needs to be with some password that’s more secure, again, than just a default, or “password”.  Now, it’s true that the current version of the Foscam baby-cam forces the user to change the default password when setting it up, but if you’ve got an older one, older than one year ago, you need to change that password (or perhaps, enable one if it doesn’t even have one), NOW.

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